fbpx
Ian Macleod Independent Bottlers Island of Islay Scotland Smokehead

Smokehead Islay Single Malt

Review of the basic version of the mysterious Islay Smokehead.

Origin: Isle of Islay (Scotland)
Type: Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Gradation: 43%ABV
Ageing barrels: Ex-Bourbon Hogshead charred
Chillfiltered: No
Added coloring: No
Owner: Ian Macleod Distillers Ltd
Avearage price: € 43.00
Official website: www.ianmacleod.com
Vote: 74/100

The basic version of Ian Macleod’s line of super-peated whiskies, a single malt whose distillery of origin is only known to be from Islay (but some murmur that it’s a young Ardbeg).
There are a number of labels containing undeclared whiskies from Islay, playing on young malts where the peatiness is particularly strong, in order to tap into that segment of the market that is looking for “strong sensations”. It’s no surprise then that Smokehead’s design hints at a certain muscular and rough imagery, which in other times would have been defined as “masculine” but which today, fortunately, goes beyond gender boundaries.

Those tasted so far have all been pleasant expressions, perhaps not monsters of complexity (nor do they want to be), but which can be drunk with good light-heartedness.
In this case, it’s worth appreciating the willingness to move away from the minimum alcohol content, even if only slightly.

Tasting notes

Full gold in the glass.
On the nose, we are in the realm of hardcore barbecue, chops and ribs marinated in Worcester sauce sizzling on the burning wood, exuding aromas of resin and toasted pine needles. Scattered around, appear sweet liquorice, caramel, toasted almonds, baked apple and candied orange, sprinkled with sea water. A sort of Islay 001, in short.
In the mouth, the meaty side tends to vanish, leaving room to burning wood that eats up almost the entire body of the whisky. The smoke is thick and veined with a discreet peppery quality, with flashes of ginger, barely letting appear citric notes with candied orange, liquorice, a vague hint of chocolate and a fleeting impression of leather.
The finish is moderately long and astringent, of dull embers, bitter orange, salt and pine needles.

Simple, as hardly anything else it could have been, the toasted soul tends to take over leaving little room for depth and richness, a smoke blanket as the label promises. For those looking for a bonfire in liquid form, this could be an excellent choice.

Reviews of Smokehead whisky in the blog:
Smokehead Extra Rare
Smokehead Sherry Bomb

Reviews of Ian Macleod whisky in the blog:
Highland As We Get it
Sheep Dip
Smokehead Extra Rare
Smokehead Sherry Bomb

Other perspectives:
Malt Review

 
   

 
 

 
     
   
 

   

 

 

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: