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Scotland Singleton Distillery Speyside Region Whisky from 100 to 200 euros

The Singleton of Glen Ord 15yo Special Release 2022

Review of the Elusive Expression finished in seasoned wind casks.

Origin: Speyside (Scotland)
Type: Single Malt Scotch Whisky
Strength: 54.2%ABV
Ageing casks: Ex-Bourbon and ex-Wine
Chillfiltered: No
Added colouring: No
Owner: Diageo
Average price: € 135.00
Official website: www.thesingleton.com
Vote: 86/100

A more or less regular presence on the Special Releases, Singleton hopped between Glendullan, Dufftown and Glen Ord, choosing the latter for 2022, aged younger than last year in ex-Bourbon refill casks and finished for over a year in seasoned casks in unspecified wine.
The label recalls a time when a bewitching enchantress lived deep in the emerald caverns of the Ord River, who could make the water dance at her command. As each solstice approached, she would fix her diamond-bright gaze on the river and weave its currents into a rich, indulgent ruby red wine. As they flowed through the Singleton’s water source, these enchanted currents gave the distillate a lush and seductive character, as alluring as the ruby solstice ritual.
With the reviews of the Special Releases I will stop here for now, as soon as I can get my hands on the two missing (Cameronbridge and Mortlach) I will complete the picture of this 2022.

Tasting notes

The wine does its duty with the aromas that reach the nose, giving ample space to red fruits declined in various forms: dried, jammy and juicy. The acidulous component is subdued, with rough woody tones and spices (nutmeg, cinnamon, cardamom) prevailing, affecting a pastry with crème caramel. In length, it releases notes of young red wine, so young that it almost shifts to strawberry grapes. Fresh and pleasant.
It begins on the palate with bitter notes, which soon pave the way for a compote of fruit, between wild and white (pear, melon and white peaches), citrusy velleities, a fair handful of tannins and a sour creaminess, like yoghurt and sour milk. Punctuated by black pepper and ginger, it throws into the mix a caress of biscuity malt, coffee chocolate and a slight vegetal and earthy note, especially along the length.
The finish is quite long and dry, the tannins raise their heads carrying red fruits, an impression of chocolate and polished wood.

More complex and articulate than I honestly expected, the finishing (red wine, for sure) plays its cards well, creating a three-dimensional effect in a dram that entertains and amuses, although it lacks a disruptive effect to make it rise to excellence. In a word, good.

Reviews of The Singleton whisky

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