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Adelphi Blended Scotch and Malt Independent Bottlers Scotland Whisky from 0 to 50 euros

Adelphi Private Stock

Review of the blended made by bottler Adelphi.

Origin: Scotland
Type: Blended Scotch Whisky
Gradation: 40%ABV
Ageing casks: Ex-Bourbon and ex-Sherry
Chillfiltered: No
Adeed coloring: No
Owner: Adelphi Distillery Ltd.
Average price: € 22.00
Official website: www.adelphidistillery.com
Vote: 74/100

The independent bottler Adelphi was founded fairly recently, in 1993, by Jamie Walker, who decided to borrow the name from the distillery founded by one of his ancestors in 1826, which closed its doors at the beginning of the last century.
In 2004 the property passed to Keith Falconer and Donald Houston, who continued the Walker tradition of producing refined and important bottlings, using the “nose” of Charles MacLean. The company was soon joined by Alex Bruce, who comes from a family with close links to the history of Scotch whisky and who brings his experience in the selection of casks.
In 2007, the idea of setting up their own distillery was born, and after obtaining the necessary permits, the construction of Ardnamurchan began, inaugurating the distillery seven years later.
The little man on the label, the Dancey Man, was made for Punch Magazine in 1860 to celebrate the law, initiated by William Gladstone, which allowed scotch to be matured without having to pay excise duty.

A blend of eight single malts and four single grains whose origins are kept strictly secret, it was originally called Granny’s Blend in honour of Jamie Walker’s grandmother.
It’s made using the solera method: at each bottling (no more than 12,000 bottles), the leftover blend is replenished in the casks respecting the exact proportions of whisky so as to maintain consistency over time.

Tasting notes

Gold with amber highlights in the glass.
The nose mixes fruity and herbaceous tones, a mixture of sweet freshness that is very appetising. It’s the sherried component that becomes more prominent, with dates, prunes, sultanas, ripe orange and a light marsala touch accompanying caramel, cinnamon, marzipan and honey, all resting on a grassy carpet with lemon drops. For such a low alcohol content, it’s nice and full-bodied.
Drier and lighter on the palate, the aromas lower their tones in line with the substance of the distillate, which pays for its dilution with a loss of depth and personality. A hint of pepper spreads over notes of dried fruit (almonds and hazelnuts), plums, red apples, vanilla, citrus fruits (orange and lemon) and honey. On the length, the citrus component becomes sweeter, almost like a soft drink.
The finish is rather short and dry with hazelnuts, vanilla and sweet orange.

The really attractive nose isn’t supported by a fleeting and light body, which although pleasant does not go much beyond honest sufficiency. A higher degree of alcoholic strength would certainly do wonders, but the fragrant character of the whisky makes it particularly suitable for blending, where it could give more than one satisfaction.

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